College of Education2020-2021

Department of Educational Psychology

Clinical Psychology, Doctor of Psychology

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology degree program has been designed to prepare prospective psychologists in the delivery of ethical, culturally-competent and evidence-based diagnostic, intervention and assessment services that effectively meet the needs of diverse populations in diverse settings. To help to ensure that students are adequately prepared, the curriculum is designed to provide for the meaningful integration of theory, training, and practice and emphasize the development of attitudes, knowledge, and skills essential to the training of clinical psychologists who are committed to the ethical provision of quality services.
 

Careers

What Can I Do with a Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology?

Graduates are trained in the clinical practice of psychology, and are able to apply the research knowledge, clinical skills of observation, assessment, intervention, and evaluation to help different segments of our ever-changing society. The areas of competency are modeled, in part, after those specified by the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology and the standards of the American Psychological Association.

With further education, one of these paths is possible:
  • Licensed Psychologist in various settings including hospitals, clinics, private practice.
  • Clinical Psychologists
  • Clinical Directors


University Requirements

  • To receive a Doctor of Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.) at Northern Arizona University, you must complete a planned group of courses, consisting of 101 units of graduate-level courses and two thousand (2000) hours of clinical practice. In addition to coursework, the Psy.D. doctoral degree requires their graduate students to engage in practicum and/or clinical experiences, to demonstrate a high level of competency in their field, and to engage in research and scholarship.

Overview

In addition to University Requirements:

  • Complete individual plan requirements.

Minimum Units for Completion 101
Additional Admission Requirements Required
Fieldwork Experience/Internship Required
Research Individualized research is required.
Licensure

This program may lead to licensure.

Clinical Competency Exam Required

Purpose Statement

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology degree program has been designed to prepare future psychologists in the delivery of ethical, culturally-competent and evidence-based diagnostic, intervention and assessment services that effectively meet the needs of diverse populations in diverse settings. Students learn to provide continuing and comprehensive mental and behavioral health care to address issues that occur across the lifespan for individuals and families. To help to ensure that students are adequately prepared, the curriculum is designed to provide for the meaningful integration of theory, training, and practice. The PsyD in Clinical Psychology degree program is designed to emphasize the development of attitudes, knowledge, and skills essential to the training of clinical psychologists who are committed to the ethical provision of quality services. Specific goals of the program include the following:

Student Learning Outcomes

PROGRAM AIM:  To prepare prospective psychologists in the delivery of ethical, culturally-competent and evidence-based diagnostic, intervention and assessment services that effectively meet the needs of diverse populations in diverse settings.
 
Profession-wide Competencies:

  1. Research/Science Foundations - Demonstrates understanding and respect for research, research methodology, techniques of data collection and analysis, biological bases of behavior, cognitive-affective bases of behavior, and development across the lifespan.
  2. Ethical and legal standards -Demonstrates application of ethical concepts and awareness of legal issues regarding professional activities with individuals, groups, and organizations.
  3. Individual and cultural diversity – Awareness, sensitivity and skills in working professionally with diverse individuals, groups and communities who represent various cultural and personal backgrounds and characteristics defined broadly and consistent with APA policy/guidelines.
  4. Professional values, attitudes and behaviors - Adherence to professional values including self-reflection, integrity, professional identity and comportment, accountability and concern for the welfare of others.
  5. Communication and interpersonal skills -Develop individual and group interpersonal skills to improve and foster participation and interaction critical for achieving individual, group and diverse community goals. Able to demonstrate verbal and non-verbal congruency and ability to demonstrate engagement
  6. Assessment - Able to assess and diagnose problems, capabilities and issues associated with diverse individuals, groups and/or organization. Able to demonstrate conceptualization of problems considering the context and other relevant factors.
  7. Intervention - Able to plan, implement and evaluate interventions designed to alleviate suffering and to promote health and well-being of diverse individuals, groups and organizations. Able to demonstrate conceptualization of problems considering the context and other relevant factors
  8. Supervision -  Able to guide, support and direct the integration of research and clinical expertise in the context of patient factors.
  9. Consultation and interprofessional/interdisciplinary skills - The ability to provide expert guidance or professional assistance in response to a client’s needs or goals. Able to use interpersonal skills needed to collaborate well with others.

Details

Additional Admission Requirements
  • Admission requirements over and above admission to NAU are required.
    • NAU Graduate Online application is required for all programs. Details on admission requirements are included in the online application.
    • Undergraduate degree from a regionally accredited institution
    • Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.00 (scale is 4.00 = "A"), or the equivalent. 
    • Admission to many graduate programs is on a competitive basis, and programs may have higher standards than those established by the Graduate College.
    • Transcripts
    • For details on graduate admission policies, please visit the Graduate Admissions Policy
    • International applicants have additional admission requirements. Please see the International Graduate Admissions Policy 


    Individual program admission requirements include:

    • 3 letters of recommendation with at least two from faculty
    • Completion of bachelor's degree in psychology, or closely-related field; or a master's degree in Psychology of closely-related field
    • Personal statement
    • Interview

    If your undergraduate GPA is less than 3.00, a graduate GPA of a 3.25 is acceptable (minimum 18 units competed as part of a master's degree).

    Students who do not have an undergraduate degree in psychology will need to complete at least five undergraduate or introductory graduate courses that are primarily psychological in content and must address these three required areas*:

    • Introduction to psychology or general psychology
    • Abnormal, psychopathology, or maladaptive behavior
    • Statistics or research methods

    *Two additional courses in field of psychology must also be completed. In addition, students who have not taken courses in the required areas must complete these classes early in their program as these courses serve as prerequisites.

Doctoral Requirements
  • Be aware that some courses may have prerequisites that you must also take. For prerequisite information click on the course or see your advisor.
     

  • PROGRAM FEE INFORMATION
  • Program fees are established by the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR). A program fee of $7000 per year, ($3500 per semester) has been approved for this program.

Campus Availability



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