College of Education2021-2022

Department of Educational Psychology

School Psychology, Educational Specialist

Learning Outcomes

Purpose Statement

The School Psychology graduate program has been designed to prepare school psychologists through the scientist-practitioner model. Integration of science and practice is accomplished through a carefully orchestrated program of study that emphasizes didactic presentation and practical applications. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in the assessment of learning and behavior problems and on developing the skills necessary to serve as an effective consultant with school personnel. Scientific knowledge is used to improve practice in the field of school psychology.

In keeping with the mission statement of the College of Education, the School Psychology
Program is committed to the preparation of professionals who are capable of helping create the schools of tomorrow. Recruitment of minority students is emphasized as well as the preparation of students who are prepared to work in rural settings and with culturally diverse populations.

The programs of study for the Ed.S. in School Psychology include a comprehensive array of courses that encompass the areas of: psychological foundations, educational foundations, professional ethics and standards, assessment, interventions, and research. This preparation provides the student with a broad array of skills to deliver psychological services in diverse educational settings.

The graduates of the School Psychology Programs are expected to integrate theoretical information from the fields of psychology and education to administer appropriate interventions with children, parents, and school personnel in a variety of educational settings. Students are expected to effectively evaluate the systems they work within as well as their own impact on the system.”

Student Learning Outcomes

Outcomes align with Standards from the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), and the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC).

 
School Psychology Program Context/ Structure: Graduate education in school psychology is delivered within the context of a comprehensive program framework based on clear goals and objectives and a sequential, integrated course of study in which human diversity is emphasized. Graduate education develops candidates’ strong affiliation with school psychology, is delivered by qualified faculty, and includes substantial coursework and supervised field experiences necessary for the preparation of competent school psychologists whose services positively impact children, families, schools, and other consumers. In addition to specialist- and/or doctoral-level programs of study, a school psychology program that offers opportunities for respecialization, retraining, and other alternative approaches to credentialing as a school psychologist ensures that program requirements are consistent with NASP graduate preparation standards.
 
Data Based Decision Making and Accountability:

  • School psychologists have knowledge of varied methods of assessment and data collection methods for identifying strengths and needs, developing effective services and programs, and measuring progress and outcomes. As part of a systematic and comprehensive process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all aspects of service delivery, school psychologists demonstrate skills to use psychological and educational assessment, data collection strategies, and technology resources and apply results to design, implement, and evaluate response to services and programs.
  • School psychologists have knowledge of varied methods of consultation, collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems and used to promote effective implementation of services. As part of a systematic and comprehensive process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all aspects of service delivery, school psychologists demonstrate skills to consult, collaborate, and communicate with others during design, implementation, and evaluation of services and programs
Student Level Direct and Indirect Services: School psychologists have knowledge of direct interventions that focus on academic and social/emotional interventions for children and families. School psychologists engage multi-disciplinary teams (including children, teachers, parents, other school professionals) to develop and implement academic and mental health interventions.
  • Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills- School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on academic skills; human learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence-based curriculum and instructional strategies. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to use assessment and data-collection methods and to implement and evaluate services that support cognitive and academic skills.
  • Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills –School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, developmental, and social influences on behavior and mental health; behavioral and emotional impacts on learning and life skills; and evidence-based strategies to promote social–emotional functioning and mental health. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to use assessment and data-collection methods and to implement and evaluate services that support socialization, learning, and mental health
 
Systems Level School Direct and Indirect Services: School psychologists have knowledge of direct and indirect services that focus on knowledge of schools and system structures, and preventive and responsive services. School psychologists implement school-wide practices to promote learning and knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors.
  • School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning - School psychologists have knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote academic outcomes, learning, social development, and mental health. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to develop and implement practices and strategies to create and maintain effective and supportive learning environments for children and others.
  • Preventive and Responsive Services - School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health, services in schools and communities to support multi-tiered prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to promote services that enhance learning, mental health, safety, and physical well-being through protective and adaptive factors and to implement effective crisis preparation, response, and recovery.
 Systems Level Family-School Collaboration Direct and Indirect Services: School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs, and culture; evidence-based strategies to support family influences on children’s learning, socialization, and mental health; and methods to develop collaboration between families and schools. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, demonstrate skills to design, implement, and evaluate services that respond to culture and context and facilitate family and school partnership/ interactions with community agencies for enhancement of academic and social–behavioral outcomes for children.
 
Diversity in Development and Learning as a Foundation of Service Delivery: School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse characteristics; principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences; and evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to diversity. School psychologists demonstrate skills to provide professional services that promote effective functioning for individuals, families, and schools with diverse characteristics, cultures, and backgrounds and across multiple contexts, with recognition that an understanding and respect for diversity in development and learning and advocacy for social justice are foundations of all aspects of service delivery.
 
Research, Program Evaluation, Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practices as Foundations of Service Delivery: School psychologists have core foundational knowledge and experiences and implement practices and strategies in research, program evaluation, and legal, ethical and professional practice.
  • Research and Program Evaluation - School psychologists have knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, varied data collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation methods sufficient for understanding research and interpreting data in applied settings. School psychologists demonstrate skills to evaluate and apply research as a foundation for service delivery and, in collaboration with others, use various techniques and technology resources for data collection, measurement, analysis, and program evaluation to support effective practices at the individual, group, and/or systems levels.
  • Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice - School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology; multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists. School psychologists demonstrate skills to provide services consistent with ethical, legal, and professional standards; engage in responsive ethical and professional decision-making; collaborate with other professionals; and apply professional work characteristics needed for effective practice as school psychologists, including respect for human diversity and social justice, communication skills, effective interpersonal skills, responsibility, adaptability, initiative, dependability, and technology skills.
 Practica and Internships in School Psychology: During systematic, comprehensive practica and internship experiences consistent with its goals and objectives, the school psychology program ensures that all candidates demonstrate application of knowledge and professional skills in relevant settings and under conditions of appropriate supervision, evaluation, and support. The school psychology program’s practica and internship develop and enhance candidates’ skills and professional characteristics needed for effective school psychology service delivery; integration of competencies across the standards of professional preparation and practice; and direct, measurable, positive impact on children, families, schools, and other consumers.

 


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