2022-2023

Applied Science - Early Childhood, Bachelor of Applied Science

Department of Teaching and Learning

College of Education

If you have completed or will complete an associate degree from a community college, you may pursue this degree.

Our goal in offering the Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) degree is to provide you with a general knowledge of management, organizational, and policy issues and to advance your communication, computer, and quantitative skills. This degree also offers you the opportunity to complete a specialization that will broaden your career horizons, promote life-long learning, and enrich your life. Northern Arizona University offers this degree at selected campuses throughout Arizona.

  • To receive a bachelor's degree at Northern Arizona University, you must complete at least 120 units of credit that minimally includes a major, the liberal studies requirements, and university requirements as listed below.

    • All of Northern Arizona University's liberal studies, diversity, junior-level writing, and capstone requirements.
    • All requirements for your specific academic plan(s).
    • At least 30 units of upper-division courses, which may include transfer work.
    • At least 30 units of coursework taken through Northern Arizona University, of which at least 18 must be upper-division courses (300-level or above). This requirement is not met by credit-by-exam, retro-credits, transfer coursework, etc.
    • A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 on all work attempted at Northern Arizona University.
    The full policy can be viewed here.

     

In addition to University Requirements:

  • 64 units in an associate's degree transfer block (If you have been awarded an AAS degree from an accredited Arizona community college, NAU will accept up to 75 transfer units.)
  • 21 units of BAS requirements
  • 21 units of Early Childhood Specialization Requirements

  • Up to 9 units of specialization prefix courses may be used to satisfy Liberal Studies requirements; these same courses may also be used to satisfy specialization requirements.

  • Elective courses, if needed, to reach an overall total of at least 120 units

Please note that students may be able to use some courses to meet more than one requirement. Contact your advisor for details.

Minimum Units for Completion 120
Highest Mathematics Required MAT 114
Additional Admission Requirements Required
AZ Transfer Students complete AGEC-A Recommended
Progression Plan Link View Progression Plan

Purpose Statement
The BAS Early Childhood degree program is designed for students who have completed or will complete an associate degree from a community college.

The purpose of this degree, which does not lead to teacher certification, is to provide a general knowledge of child development, early literacy development, and preschool curriculum and assessment. This degree is a viable way for students interested in early childhood education to continue their education after earning an associate degree from a community college. The BAS Early Childhood degree, steeped in national early childhood standards, concentrates on educating students about the expanding, specialized knowledge base concerning early childhood. Students also complete an independent study project as part of the capstone experience focused on a selected topic in early childhood education.

Students who complete this degree will be prepared to take advantage of career opportunities, including working in preschools, non-profit organizations, state agencies, and other venues where specialized coursework in early childhood is required or preferred for positions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Learning outcomes for this degree are encapsulated in the 2010 National Association of Young Children (NAEYC) Standards for Initial Early Childhood Professional Preparation:

STANDARD 1. PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING
Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs are grounded in a child development knowledge base. They use their understanding of young children’s characteristics and needs, and of multiple interacting influences on children’s development and learning, to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child. Key elements of Standard 1:

  • 1a: Knowing and understanding young children’s characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8
  • 1b: Knowing and understanding the multiple influences on early development and learning 1c: Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children


STANDARD 2. BUILDING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS
Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs understand that successful early childhood education depends upon partnerships with children’s families and communities. They know about, understand, and value the importance and complex characteristics of children’s families and communities. They use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to involve all families in their children’s development and learning. Key elements of Standard 2:

  • 2a: Knowing about and understanding diverse family and community characteristics
  • 2b: Supporting and engaging families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships
  • 2c: Involving families and communities in young children’s development and learning


STANDARD 3. OBSERVING, DOCUMENTING, AND ASSESSING TO SUPPORT YOUNG CHILDREN AND FAMILIES
Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs understand that child observation, documentation, and other forms of assessment are central to the practice of all early childhood professionals. They know about and understand the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment. They know about and use systematic observations, documentation, and other effective assessment strategies in a responsible way, in partnership with families and other professionals, to positively influence the development of every child. Key elements of Standard 3:

  • 3a: Understanding the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment – including its use in development of appropriate goals, curriculum, and teaching strategies for young children 3b: Knowing about and using observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches, including the use of technology in documentation, assessment and data collection
  • 3c: Understanding and practicing responsible assessment to promote positive outcomes for each child, including the use of assistive technology for children with disabilities
  • 3d: Knowing about assessment partnerships with families and with professional colleagues to build effective learning environments


STANDARD 4. USING DEVELOPMENTALLY EFFECTIVE APPROACHES
Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs understand that teaching and learning with young children is a complex enterprise, and its details vary depending on children’s ages, characteristics, and the settings within which teaching and learning occur. They understand and use positive relationships and supportive interactions as the foundation for their work with young children and families. Candidates know, understand, and use a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child’s development and learning. Key elements of Standard 4:

  • 4a: Understanding positive relationships and supportive interactions as the foundation of their work with young children
  • 4b: Knowing and understanding effective strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology
  • 4c: Using a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching /learning approaches 4d: Reflecting on own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child 


STANDARD 5. USING CONTENT KNOWLEDGE TO BUILD MEANINGFUL CURRICULUM Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs use their knowledge of academic disciplines to design, implement, and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning for each and every young child. Candidates understand the importance of developmental domains and academic (or content) disciplines in early childhood curriculum. They know the essential concepts, inquiry tools, and structure of content areas, including academic subjects, and can identify resources to deepen their understanding. Candidates use their own knowledge and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curriculum that promotes comprehensive developmental and learning outcomes for every young child. Key elements of Standard 5:

  • 5a: Understanding content knowledge and resources in academic disciplines: language and literacy; the arts – music, creative movement, dance, drama, visual arts; mathematics; science, physical activity, physical education, health and safety; and social studies
  • 5b: Knowing and using the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines
  • 5c: Using own knowledge, appropriate early learning standards, and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally meaningful and challenging curriculum for each child


STANDARD 6. BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL
Candidates prepared in early childhood degree programs identify and conduct themselves as members of the early childhood profession. They know and use ethical guidelines and other professional standards related to early childhood practice. They are continuous, collaborative learners who demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives on their work, making informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources. They are informed advocates for sound educational practices and policies. Key elements of Standard 6:

  • 6a: Identifying and involving oneself with the early childhood field
  • 6b: Knowing about and upholding ethical standards and other early childhood professional guidelines
  • 6c: Engaging in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource
  • 6d: Integrating knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education
  • 6e: Engaging in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession


STANDARD 7. EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCES Field experiences and clinical practice are planned and sequenced so that candidates develop the knowledge, skills and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children across the entire developmental period of early childhood – in at least two of the three early childhood age groups (birth – age 3, 3 through 5, 5 through 8 years) and in the variety of settings that offer early education (early school grades, child care centers and homes, Head Start programs). Key elements of Standard 7:

  • 7a. Opportunities to observe and practice in at least two of the three early childhood age groups (birth – age 3, 3-5, 5-8)
  • 7b. Opportunities to observe and practice in at least two of the three main types of early education settings (early school grades, child care centers and homes, Head Start programs)

Additional Admission Requirements
  • Admission requirements over and above admission to NAU are required.
    • To be admitted into a Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS) plan, you must have an associate's degree, either completed or in progress, at a regionally accredited institution and the associate's degree must be completed prior to the awarding of the BAS degree.
Liberal Studies Requirement
    • Please note that you may use the same course to satisfy both a liberal studies and a BAS Requirement. 
    • Up to 9 units of major prefix courses may be used to satisfy Liberal Studies requirements; these same courses may also be used to satisfy major requirements.
    • Students who have completed the Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC) from an Arizona public or tribal community college, the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC), or California State University General Education (CSUGE) from a California public community college are considered to have satisfied NAU’s Liberal Studies Distribution Blocks and Foundation requirements as well as the US Ethnic and Global Diversity requirements.
Transfer Block
    • 64 units in an associate's degree transfer block. If you have been awarded an AAS degree from an accredited Arizona community college, NAU will accept up to 75 transfer units.
Major Requirements
  • This Applied Science Specialization, associated with completing an Associate’s Degree at a Community College, requires 42 units distributed as follows:

    • BAS requirements: 21 units
    • Early Childhood Specialization Requirements: 21 units


    BAS Requirements (21 units)

  • This coursework is designed to help you acquire a general knowledge of management, organizational, and policy issues while advancing your professional communication, computer, and quantitative skills. Some departments may require that you take specific courses from the BAS Requirements or may place other restrictions on the courses that the department requires. Please see departmental requirements for specific information. Other courses may be used to fulfill the BAS Elective requirements. Please note: at least 15 units in the core must be upper-division (300-400 level) courses.

General Electives
  • Additional coursework is required, if, after you have met the previously described requirements, you have not yet completed a total of 120 units of credit. 

    You may take these remaining courses from any academic areas, using these courses to pursue your specific interests and goals. We encourage you to consult with your advisor to select the courses that will be most advantageous to you. (Please note that you may also use prerequisites or transfer credits as electives if they weren't used to meet major, minor, or liberal studies requirements.)

Additional Information
  • Be aware that some courses may have prerequisites that you must also take. For prerequisite information click on the course or see your advisor.